ligaturesignature

tamorapierce:

aliasofwestgate:

justira:

Reblogging not just because special effects are cool but because body doubles, stunt doubles, acting doubles, talent doubles — all the people whose faces we’re not supposed to see but whose bodies make movies and tv shows possible — these people need and deserve more recognition. We see their bodies onscreen, delight in the shape and motion of those bodies, but even as we pick apart everything else that goes on both on and behind the screen, I just don’t see the people who are those bodies getting the love and recognition they deserve.

We’re coming to love and recognize actors who work in full-body makeup/costumes, such as Andy Serkis, or actors whose entire performances, or large chunks thereof, are motion captured or digitized (lately sometimes also Andy Serkis!). But people like Leander Deeny play an enormous part in making characters such as Steve Rogers come to life, too. Body language is a huge part of a performance and of characterization. For characters/series with a lot of action, a stunt person can have a huge influence on how we read and interpret a character, such as the influence Heidi Moneymaker has had on the style and choreography of Black Widow’s signature fighting style. Talent doubles breathe believability and discipline-specific nuance into demanding storylines.

Actors are creative people themselves, and incredibly important in building the characters we see onscreen. But if we agree that they’re more than dancing monkeys who just do whatever the directors/writers say, then we have to agree that doubles are more than that, too. Doubles make creative decisions too, and often form strong, mutually supportive relationship with actors.

image image

Image 1: “I would like to thank Kathryn Alexandre, the most generous actor I’ve ever worked opposite.”

Image 2: “Kathryn who’s playing my double who’s incredible.”

[ Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany on her acting double, Kathryn Alexandre, two images from a set on themarysue, via lifeofkj ]

image image

image image

I’ve got a relationship that goes back many, many years with Dave. And I would hate for people to just see that image of me and Dave and go, “oh, there’s Dan Radcliffe with a person in a wheelchair.” Because I would never even for a moment want them to assume that Dave was anything except for an incredibly important person in my life.

[ Daniel Radcliffe talking about David Holmes, his stunt double for 2001-2009, who was paralysed while working on the Harry Potter films. David Holmes relates his story here. Gifset via smeagoled ]

With modern tv- and film-making techniques, many characters are composite creations. The characters we see onscreen or onstage have always been team efforts, with writers, directors, makeup artists, costume designers, special effects artists, production designers, and many other people all contributing to how a character is ultimately realized in front of us. Many different techniques go into something like the creation of Skinny Steve — he’s no more all Leander Deeny than he is all Chris Evans.

But as fandom dissects the anatomy of scenes in ever-increasing detail to get at microexpressions and the minutiae of body language, let’s recognize the anatomy in the scenes, too. I don’t mean to take away from the work Chris Evans or any other actors do (he is an amazing Steve Rogers and I love him tons), but fandom needs to do better in recognizing the bodies, the other people, who make up the characters we love and some of our very favourite shots of them. Chris Evans has an amazing body, but so does Leander Deeny — that body is beautiful; that body mimicked Chris Evans’s motions with amazing, skilled precision; that body moved Steve Rogers with emotion and grace and character.

Fandom should do better than productions and creators who fail to be transparent about the doubles in their productions. On the screen, suspension of disbelief is key and the goal is to make all the effort that went into the production vanish and leave only the product itself behind. But when the film is over and the episode ends, let’s remember everyone who helped make that happen.

image

[ Sam Hargrave (stunt double for Chris Evans) and James Young (stunt double for Sebastian Stan, and fight choreographer), seen from behind, exchange a fistbump while in costume on the set of Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Image via lifeofkj ]

I applaud these guys as much as the suit actors in my japanese tokusatsu shows. They do just as much work. 

Hat’s off to them, and my thanks for all they do.

(Source: stark-industries-rnd)


fitwordnerd:

lesserjoke:

highlordmhoram:

realfart:

deerdem:

selkiesounds:

bogmoth:

I said “have a nice day!” to this old dude and apparently that’s not fucking good enough because he retrieved his wallet and from like a stack of 30 of these things pulled one out and gave it to me and said something like “I hope you reconsider your choices next time”

holy shit

This is the most self entitled shit i’ve seen all day

what the fUCK

Yo linguists, get in here. Joe, I want to hear what you have to say on this one.

Yeah, I mean, I think everyone can already sense just how bogus all this is. But I can definitely confirm that with my official linguist hat. I mean, geez:
a) Barring slips-of-the-tongue or rare neurological conditions, what someone said is what they meant to say. Not only is it rude to act like someone’s personal autocorrect — it’s also erroneous. People say what they intend to, regardless of how anybody else feels about the form.
b) There’s no such thing as incorrect English, at least in terms of what a fluent speaker produces. English, like any language, is more of an abstract composite of a multitude of separate dialects. The fact that two English speakers talk differently from one another doesn’t make one’s language incorrect.
c) Imperatives don’t have to be commands; they can also function as polite requests like “please pass the salt”. But the actual function of an utterance like “have a nice day” isn’t to command or even request something from the listener any more than saying “excuse me” is. Loads of expressions have the grammatical form of an imperative without putting any sort of force on the listener. Literally no one is commanding people to have a nice day.
d) Also literally no one doesn’t understand that the “one” in “have a good one” refers to the current day. It’s a straight-up lie to say that you’re not sure what people mean by this. It may not be something you would say yourself — see point b) above — but you definitely understood it.
e) Saying something is “not a problem” in no way implies that it could have been a problem, any more than saying “yes” to a minor request implies that the answer could have been no. Both responses are just functioning as tokens of agreement and it’s ridiculously pedantic to pretend otherwise.
f) Appropriate communicational norms are determined entirely by community consensus. (Why is it polite to say “bless you” after somebody sneezes? Because everyone agrees that it is.) Different sub-communities can have slightly different norms, and it’s important to be able to recognize those differences when communicating with a non-peer. But when people with different views of what’s polite interact, each one’s utterances are equally “inappropriate.”
And I mean, that’s just scratching the surface here. The whole thing is a bogus, pedantic attempt to control other people’s behavior when the only thing they did to deserve it was be polite enough to wish someone a nice day. 100% ridiculous, linguist-confirmed.

Excellent linguistacizing, Joe! Also I wish I could have reblogged your tags but I’m too lazy to figure out how. 
But seriously, people, best description of the errors in that stupid photo.
View Larger

fitwordnerd:

lesserjoke:

highlordmhoram:

realfart:

deerdem:

selkiesounds:

bogmoth:

I said “have a nice day!” to this old dude and apparently that’s not fucking good enough because he retrieved his wallet and from like a stack of 30 of these things pulled one out and gave it to me and said something like “I hope you reconsider your choices next time”

holy shit

This is the most self entitled shit i’ve seen all day

what the fUCK

Yo linguists, get in here. Joe, I want to hear what you have to say on this one.

Yeah, I mean, I think everyone can already sense just how bogus all this is. But I can definitely confirm that with my official linguist hat. I mean, geez:

a) Barring slips-of-the-tongue or rare neurological conditions, what someone said is what they meant to say. Not only is it rude to act like someone’s personal autocorrect — it’s also erroneous. People say what they intend to, regardless of how anybody else feels about the form.

b) There’s no such thing as incorrect English, at least in terms of what a fluent speaker produces. English, like any language, is more of an abstract composite of a multitude of separate dialects. The fact that two English speakers talk differently from one another doesn’t make one’s language incorrect.

c) Imperatives don’t have to be commands; they can also function as polite requests like “please pass the salt”. But the actual function of an utterance like “have a nice day” isn’t to command or even request something from the listener any more than saying “excuse me” is. Loads of expressions have the grammatical form of an imperative without putting any sort of force on the listener. Literally no one is commanding people to have a nice day.

d) Also literally no one doesn’t understand that the “one” in “have a good one” refers to the current day. It’s a straight-up lie to say that you’re not sure what people mean by this. It may not be something you would say yourself — see point b) above — but you definitely understood it.

e) Saying something is “not a problem” in no way implies that it could have been a problem, any more than saying “yes” to a minor request implies that the answer could have been no. Both responses are just functioning as tokens of agreement and it’s ridiculously pedantic to pretend otherwise.

f) Appropriate communicational norms are determined entirely by community consensus. (Why is it polite to say “bless you” after somebody sneezes? Because everyone agrees that it is.) Different sub-communities can have slightly different norms, and it’s important to be able to recognize those differences when communicating with a non-peer. But when people with different views of what’s polite interact, each one’s utterances are equally “inappropriate.”

And I mean, that’s just scratching the surface here. The whole thing is a bogus, pedantic attempt to control other people’s behavior when the only thing they did to deserve it was be polite enough to wish someone a nice day. 100% ridiculous, linguist-confirmed.

Excellent linguistacizing, Joe! Also I wish I could have reblogged your tags but I’m too lazy to figure out how. 

But seriously, people, best description of the errors in that stupid photo.


A recent study from Duke University’s School of Medicine found that the available HPV vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, don’t prevent the HPV infections common in black women. Gardasil and Cervarix protect against HPV 16, HPV 18, HPV 6 and HPV 11 — strains that are notorious for causing cervical cancers. The only problem? HPV 16 and 18 occur more in white women than black women, who tend to show HPV subtypes 33, 35, 58, and 68. So while white women might also not be protected from all strains by the HPV vaccine, they are certainly in a much safer position than black women.

“HPV 16 and 18 occur less frequently in African-Americans than in whites,” Dr. Cathrine Hoyo, associate professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Duke University School of Medicine, told Health Day. Duke’s study looked at 600 abnormal pap smears and found that almost 86 percent of the women examined had detectable HPV. Yet, as Hoyo explained, “African-Americans had half the HPV 16 and 18 frequency as whites did.”

As Bustle reported last summer, this disparity may be the reason that African-American women are 20 percent more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer…It’s upsetting that Gardasil leaves many black women without adequate protection against HPV and cervical cancer. Conflating the healthcare needs of white women with those of black women keeps us from accessing adequate treatment in multiple areas, and this is especially troubling when it comes to HPV. Had there been funding for a vaccine specifically designed for my black, female body, a shot that protects my body as well as it does white women, I might very well be HPV-free today.

What It’s Like to Have HPV: How the Vaccine Failed to Protect Me as a Black Woman, by Evette Dionne (via nitanahkohe)


mqandmrs:

Alicia’s American Sign Language Dictionary.  Alicia is showing you four important signs in ASL:  ”I Love You,” “Queer,” “Bisexual,” and “Transgender.” 

When you’re talking about someone’s identity, make sure to only use words they’re OK with. 

If anyone has suggestions to improve these pages, they are very much welcome. 

Mq. & Mrs. is a queer/trans coloring book in progress that only uses real people as models.  New pages are published every Sunday at noon. Interested in modeling for a page? See our site for more info.  


trixiebobixie:

iprayforangels:

suddin:

ectricark:

imsirius:

#THEY DON’T WRITE EM LIKE THIS ANYMORE

[echoes of eleven blowing up cybermen to get information in the distance]

People who don’t love Nine are the dumbest.

People think that Nine is dark sullen and a killer. They’re wrong. Nine not dark. He’s light and happy and in love. He wear a leather jacket and is the closest Doctor the the Time War but he is not dark. He is a light person who is fighting his dark past. He knows what he’s done and is fighting to write his wrongs. He just wants everyone to live.

Eleven on the other hand is the exact opposite. People think he’s a puppy in a fez. They’re wrong. He is not happy and joyful. He’s careless. He is having adventures while ruining lives and killing people. He is the man who forgets. He has forgotten the pain he felt after what he did and now is so comfortable killing.

He doesn’t remember Nine. Nine, the Doctor with depression. Nine, the Doctor who fell in love with an nineteen year old shop girl who didn’t need a magic back story to be special. Nine, the Doctor who went and saved his friends without killing. Nine, the Doctor who chose to lose instead of causing loss.

Nine chooses to give up being a god. Eleven pretends he is a god. Nine would make a merciful god. Eleven acts like a vengeful god. Nine is a puppy in a leather jacket. Eleven is a a killer in a fez.

Wow, that just summed up my feelings on where Doctor Who has gone better than anything else I’ve read. 

(Source: winterinthetardis)